New Publications

 


Nitrogen Fixing Trees for Fodder Production, Proceedings of an International Workshop. 1998. Daniel, J.N., and J.M. Roshetko, eds. Forest, Farm and Community Tree Research Reports (Special Issue). The Taiwan Forestry Research Institute  and Council of Agriculture, Taiwan, Republic of China, and Winrock International, Morrilton, Arkansas, USA. 259 pages.

The Nitrogen Fixing Tree Association and BAIF Development Research Foundation co-hosted an international workshop on NFTs for fodder in Pune, India, March 20-25, 1995. Forty-three individuals from 18 countries participated in the workshop. Their Papers are presented in sections on Potential of Nitrogen Fixing Trees (NFTs) for Fodder Production; Fodder Production with NFTs; N-Fixing Fodder Trees for Difficult Sites; Agroforestry Systems with N-Fixing Fodder Trees; Nutritive Value of and Feeding Trials with N-fixing Fodder Trees; Genetic Improvement of N-Fixing Fodder Trees; and Overview of  NFTs.

FACT-Net participants (professional level) in 1998 will receive a copy from the printer. FACT-Net participants may purchase additional copies from FACT Net for US$ 10.00 plus shipping and handling. The cost to non-participants is US$ 15.00 per copy plus shipping and handling.

 


Albizia and Paraserianthes Production and Use. A Field Manual. 1998. James M. Roshetko, ed. Forest, Farm and Community Tree Network. The Taiwan Forestry Research Institute and Council of Agriculture, Taiwan, Republic of China, and Winrock International, Morrilton, Arkansas, USA.  67 pages.

Chapters include: Botany and Ecology; Establishment; Wood Production and Use; Intercropping Systems; Fodder Production Systems, Other uses; Insect Pests and Diseases; and Tree Improvement.

The cost to FACT-Net participants and others is US$ 6.00 and US$ 9.00 per copy plus shipping and handling, respectively.

 


Forest, Farm, and Community Tree Research Reports. Volume 2, 1997. The Taiwan Forestry Research Institute and Council of Agriculture, Taiwan, Republic of China, and Winrock International, Morrilton, Arkansas, USA. 65 pages.

FACT-Net participants (professional level) in 1998 will receive a copy from the printer. FACT-Net participants may purchase additional copies from FACT Net for US$ 7.00 plus shipping and handling. The cost to non-participants is US$ 9.00 per copy plus shipping and handling.

 


Production and Use of Calliandra calothyrsus — A Field Manual

The genus Calliandra contains 132 species. Most are native to the Americas, but a few species are native to the South Asian subcontinent or Africa, including Madagascar. Most species are shrubs or small trees, although a few are large trees or herbs. Native to Central America and Mexico, Calliandra calothyrsus is the most widely used species in the genus. In 1936, Indonesian foresters planted C. calothyrsus in screening trials to evaluate its potential as a shade tree for coffee plantations. Although the species proved unsuitable for this use in Indonesia, farmers on Java have planted C. calothyrsus widely for fuelwood production and land reclamation. It is also planted for green manure, animal fodder, bee forage, and pulpwood.

The successful use of C. calothyrsus in Indonesia has stimu-lated global interest in the genus, and trials are in progress in countries throughout the tropics to evaluate Calliandra species and their potential uses in agroforestry systems. Through its international Calliandra network, the Oxford Forestry Institute (OFI) is taking a lead role in the investigation of genetic variation within the genus. OFI has sent Calliandra seed to researchers in 120 countries for the establishment of species and provenance trials and seed production activities.

In January 1996, Winrock International, the Indonesian Minis-try of Forestry’s Agency for Forestry Research and Development, and the Forestry Research Program on behalf of the Overseas Development Administration (UK) held an international workshop to discuss recent and current research and development activities focusing on the genus Calliandra.

The workshop took place from 23 to 27 January 1996 in Bogor, Indonesia. Thirty-nine participants from 14 countries shared their research and observations. Winrock International has published selected papers presented at the workshop in a proceedings volume.

During the workshop, working groups summarized current knowledge on Calliandra botany and ecology. They also prepared summaries on seed collection and production, establishment methods, uses, and fodder-production systems, focusing on C. calothyrsus. The summaries were used to prepare the field manual on C. calothyrsus production and use. Information in the field manual is presented in chapters on botany and ecology; seed collection and production; establishment; uses; fodder production; and pests and diseases. The appendices include addresses of seed and inoculant suppliers; selected references; and morphological and seedling keys to the identification of species in the Racemosae.

The United States Department of Agriculture/Forest Service/ Tropical Forestry Program provided financial support for editing the field manual. The Taiwan Forestry Research Institute arranged the printing and distribution with financial support from the Council of Agriculture, Taiwan, Republic of China.

The price per copy for FACT Net participants is US$6.00. For non-participants the price per copy is US$9.00. Shipping and handling charges are not included in these prices. To order the field manual please contact FACT Net.

 


Nitrogen fixing trees for fodder -- A field manual

Livestock play an important role in small-scale farming systems throughout the world. They provide traction to plow fields, manure to fertilize crops, and food products for human consumption. Most often livestock graze fallow fields, pastures and woodlands deriving most of their sustenance from crop residue, grasses and other herbaceous plants. A smaller but important
component of livestock diets comes from tree fodder. In addition to harvesting tree fodder from natural forests, savanna and woodlots, farmers often deliberately propagate trees to expand fodder resources.

Many of the most important fodder trees are nitrogen fixing species. Through a symbiotic relationship with Rhizobium soil bacteria, these species are able to convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form they can use for growth. This ability enables nitrogen fixing trees (NFTs) to tolerate infertile sites and produce protein-rich fodder without high inputs of artificial nitrogen fertilizer.

Many NFTs have other characteristics that make them particularly valuable for fodder. These include:

 To highlight current research results and development activities, the BAIF Development Research Foundation and FACT Net sponsored an international workshop on "Nitrogen fixing trees for fodder" in Pune, India from March 20 - 25, 1995.

Workshop participants drafted chapters for Nitrogen Fixing Trees for Fodder -- A Field Manual. Information is summarized in chapters on nitrogen fixing trees for fodder production; fodder tree establishment; selecting species of nitrogen fixing fodder trees; fodder production systems; nutritive value and animal production from fodder trees; problems and constraints with fodder trees; and seed collection and multiplication. The appendices include addresses of seed and inoculant suppliers and authors, and selected references.

The United States Department of Agriculture Forestry Support Program (USDA/FS/IF) and Winrock International provided financial support to produce the manual.

The price per copy for FACT Net participants is US$6.00. The price per copy for non-participants is US$9.00. Shipping and handling charges are not included in these prices. To order a copy please contact FACT Net.


Complete list of FACT sheets and other FACT Net publications